A Body in Fukushima: Momouchi Summer

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This video piece was created as a part of photo exhibition, A BODY IN FUKUSHIMA, a collaboration between photographer William Johnston and movement artist Eiko Otake. The 12 minute video consists of still photographs taken by Johnston over two days in July 2014 at Momouchi Station on the Joban Line. After the triple disaster --earthquake, tsunami and nuclear plant explosions-- struck Fukushima and the neighboring prefectures of Japan, no train passed this rural station.

Edited by Alexis Moh with Eiko, the video was shown in the South Gallery of the Center for the Arts, where a series of photos taken at the same location was exhibited as a part of Wesleyan University's three-gallery exhibition,  A Body in Fukushima. Sound score includes on-site recording by Jake Price.

A Body in Fukushima bears witness to a nuclear disaster and Johnston's photographs reveal Eiko's remorseful responses to the deserted area. Eiko had created two video essays using Johnston's sill photos from the two trips to Fukushima: A Body in Fukushima: Winter 2014 and A Body in Fukushima: Summer 2014

This video has a different focus. In rural Japan there are tales about white foxes and about imaginary creatures such as “kappa,” who play tricks on people after dusk. In this post-3.11 landscape (shorthand for the tsunami's date and ensuing event), with no other humans present, Eiko wonders if these creatures might dance in an empty station in bright daylight. Looking at the photos taken in Momouchi Station Eiko thought she looks like these creatures.