Students' responses to the Retrospective Project performances(2012)

Students' responses to the Retrospective Project performances(2012)

Thank You’s To Eiko and Koma University of Maryland, May 2012
From the students in Class DANC283 Foundations of Dance History

Eiko and Koma
Eiko and Koma were most fascinated to me!  Meeting Eiko was such an awakening experience in everything she said and gave during our lecture.  Again, I felt like talking with her for hours about their work and who they are as people. They sort of represented for me the true essence of life; meaning that it continues and participating within it brings you to another level of sharing, being and giving.  I appreciated Eiko's honesty and genuine spirit and the one comment she made about being "naked".  Wow! It was symbolic of so many things for me and I am even more motivated to join my two passions in working with people.  Thanks.  Jacquelyn

Eiko and Koma, you are two people that I will always remember because of the depth of your work and the honesty that you share with us that leads us all to an inner spiritual awakening.  Jacquelyn Horton

Eiko and Koma, Thank you so much for speaking and teaching some of my classes. The message you bring through your dancing is powerful, beautiful, and something I will never forget.  Annie Ponton

Eiko and Koma allow me to realize that there is no right or wrong way to move. They move from impulses, and it is a great feeling to experience it for myself. Eiko and Koma also taught me that little is okay. Slight adjustments are actually extremely interesting. They are both always true to one another, themselves, and to their work.

Eiko and Koma,
1. Thank you for helping me realize that there is no right or wrong way to move.
2. Staying true to one another, yourselves, and to your work has only inspired me to do the same. -Bethany Disque

Eiko and Koma,
Thank you for the time you have dedicated to us here at UMD.  I was struck by the power and emotional depth of your work.  Your performance helped me to realize that sometimes less really is more in dance. Emile Davignon

Eiko and Koma,
Thank you for all of the times you came to UMD this year. I was very glad that I was able to not only come to the talk that Eiko did with our class, but to also have both of you teach in my modern class. You have opened my creative mind to a whole new way of thinking about dance and choreography. Jennifer Alcott 

Eiko and Koma-
Your works are awe inspiring and have made me change the way I think about dance. Your ability to create honest works that are both simple and powerful is incredible. Thank you so much for your commitment to Maryland! Jessica Garrett

Everything about Eiko and Koma's evening portrayed how delicate each sense can be, including your mind. The word "fragile" is an adjective meaning easily broken, shattered, or damaged; delicate, which seemed to explain the night overall. The expression on both Eiko and Koma's faces and the manner in which they danced depicted them as delicate, as if they had experienced something where they had been damaged. Even my thoughts became “fragile” as they were easily broken and distracted by the movement I saw. Cristina Camacho 

Eiko and Koma
Thank you for coming to UMD as many times as you have. I learn new things from the two of you every time you teach. I really became in tune with my muscles and body awareness through your work. Sydney Pearson

Eiko and Koma's performance was very enlightening for me because it made me more aware that a 'dance performance' is also a form of visual art. Their bodies in space and the environment they created was extremely powerful and moving. It was also very interesting to learn a little bit more about thier artistic process in order to help me understand ways in which I could expand mine. Courtney Burke

Eiko and Koma
You guys have shown me the beauty of the human body and truly embraced a sense of rawness in your dances. You really proved that nothing is too small to go unnoticed. Megan Piluk

Eiko and Koma have been exciting guests at the University of Maryland for important structural and choreographic reasons. Their work and pedagogy suggest that intent, research, and a defined point of departure for artistic work is important.  In addition, their use of mischievousness, carelessness, and subversion is exciting and resonates with my own politics of social justice and critical theory. The duality of underlying structure and non-linear method feels very rich in my nascent dance career.  Connor Voss

Your heart, your soul, your salt, your bodies – in gratitude of your immense, artful generosity. Miriam Phillips, Dance Faculty